Tag: History

The Pity of War

In The Pity of War, Niall Ferguson makes a simple and provocative argument: that the human atrocity known as the Great War was entirely England’s fault. Britain, according to Ferguson, entered into war based on naive assumptions of German aims-and England’s entry into the war transformed a Continental conflict into a world war, which they then badly mishandled, necessitating American i... »

Destiny and Power

In this brilliant biography, Jon Meacham, the Pulitzer Prize–winning author, chronicles the life of George Herbert Walker Bush. Drawing on President Bush’s personal diaries, on the diaries of his wife, Barbara, and on extraordinary access to the forty-first president and his family, Meacham paints an intimate and surprising portrait of an intensely private man who led the nation through tumu... »

Nazi Princess – Hitler, Lord Rothermere and Princess Stephanie von Hohenlohe

Born to a middle-class Viennese family and of partly Jewish descent, after marriage to (and divorce from) a German prince, Stephanie von Hohenlohe became a close confidante of Hitler, Goring, Himmler (who declared her an ‘honorary Aryan’) and von Ribbentrop. After arriving in London in 1932, she moved in the most exclusive circles, arranging the visits of the Duke and Duchess of Windso... »

500 Days: Secrets and Lies in the Terror Wars

Kurt Eichenwald-New York Times bestselling author of Conspiracy of Fools and The Informant– recounts the first 500 days after 9/11 in a comprehensive, compelling page-turner as gripping as any thriller. In 500 Days, master chronicler Kurt Eichenwald lays bare the harrowing decisions, deceptions, and delusions of the eighteen months that changed the world forever, as leaders raced to protect ... »

The Book of the Poppy

The Flanders poppy was taken on as an emblem of remembrance shortly after the First World War ended in 1918. Since then, its reach has expanded across the world, and today it reminds us of the great sacrifice paid by so many in so many conflicts. This beautiful commemorative book tells the story of the remembrance poppy and is a wonderful tribute to all those who have fallen in global conflicts. W... »

The Surrender of Singapore – Three Years of Hell 1942-45

Until the late 1930s, Singapore was noted as a popular stop-off point for wealthy European travellers on their way to countries such as Australia and New Zealand. All of that changed with the outbreak of the Second World War.Despite Major-General William Dobbie, the General Officer Commanding Malaya between 8 November 1935 and August 1939, warning that Singapore could be conquered by the Japanese,... »

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration

EDITORIAL REVIEW: In this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize–winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life. From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America. Wilkerson c... »

Laughing Shall I Die – Lives and Deaths of the Great Vikings (2018)

Laughing Shall I Die explores the Viking fascination with scenes of heroic death. The literature of the Vikings is dominated by famous last stands, famous last words, death songs, and defiant gestures, all presented with grim humor. Much of this mindset is markedly alien to modern sentiment, and academics have accordingly shunned it. And yet, it is this same worldview that has always powered the p... »

Silk Road

SILK ROAD takes you into the golden age of China’s multi-cultural Tang dynasty. Aided by ghosts, goddesses, dragons, and her own determination, the heroine becomes a courtesan, a musician, a runaway, a wandering swordswoman, a poet, and more. “Larsen has used a dazzling diversity of prose styles to adroitly demonstrate how history is transmuted through the centuries into something not ... »

Odyssey of the Unknown Anzac

Ten years after the end of World War I, the Sydney Sun reported that an unknown Anzac still lay in a Sydney psychiatric hospital. ‘This man . . . was found wandering in a London street during the war,’ reported the paper. ‘He said he was an Australian soldier. Beyond his first statement that he was a Digger, he has not given any information about himself.’  Thousands of peo... »

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